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"FIP in Cats: Can You Test for It? The Answer May Surprise You!"

Currently, Diagnosing FIP in Cats presents a challenge without a definitive test available. While measuring antibody levels or titers to coronavirus is possible, it cannot conclusively differentiate between exposure to FeCV and FIPV.



A positive result only confirms previous exposure to coronavirus, not necessarily to FIPV.

Presumptive FIP diagnosis is given to young cats with a fever unresponsive to antibiotics and high coronavirus titers, particularly when fluid accumulation occurs in body cavities. A cat with a high coronavirus titer is not more likely to develop FIP or be an FIPV carrier than a cat with a low titer.


Moreover, immune suppressed cats may not have elevated coronavirus titers due to their immune system's inability to produce enough antibodies against the virus.


Several tests can detect the virus, such as the immunoperoxidase or the immunofluorescence test, requiring an assessment of affected tissue via biopsy. PCR can identify viral genetic material in tissue or body fluid. However, none of these tests is 100% accurate, and each has limitations that can lead to false positive or negative results.




Source: Online




"FIP in Cats: Can You Test for It? The Answer May Surprise You!"
"FIP in Cats: Can You Test for It? The Answer May Surprise You!"

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